Will the upcoming “Super Moon” cause natural disasters?

On March 19, the moon will swing around Earth more closely than it has in the past 18 years, lighting up the night sky from just 221,567 miles (356,577 kilometers) away. On top of that, it will be full. And one astrologer believes it could inflict massive damage on the planet.

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What exactly is a “Super Moon”?

The term refers to the unusually large new (or full) moon that earthlings see when the moon travels almost as close as it can to Earth. An “extreme Super Moon” occurs when the moon reaches its absolute closest point. On March 19, the moon will be only 221,556 miles away — the first extreme Super Moon in nearly 20 years.

Meaning…the moon is going to be SUPER HUGE O.O! so make sure you go outside during the night and take a look and maybe some pictures!

A Astrologers point of view!

Richard Nolle, a noted astrologer who runs the website astropro.com, has famously termed the upcoming full moon at lunar perigee (the closest approach during its orbit) an “extreme supermoon.” When the moon goes super-extreme, Nolle said the following words:

chaos will ensue: Huge storms, earthquakes, volcanoes and other natural disasters can be expected to wreak havoc on Earth. (It should be noted that astrology is not a real science, but merely makes connections between astronomical and mystical events.)

So with that said should we be realy worried ? or is it just a theory of a crazy man that tries to scare to world with his predictions…..?

Those who believe in horoscopes might be. Some astrologers (not astronomers) say this natural wonder signals the beginning of a “moonageddon,” coinciding with enormous storms, earthquakes and floods. Kit Karson At Psychic Cosmo further predicts that the financial markets could collapse as prices surge into “panic mode.”

Are they for real? O.o

Well according to the past some big natural disasters such as New England hurricane in 1938 and the Australian Hunter Valley floods of 1955 happened during Super Moons and also the last Super Moon wich happened in 2005 happened around the same time as the Hurricane Katrina and the Indonesian tsunami. So if the “Super Moon” has realy something to do with it we should realy be concerned ?

Althought there is no science backing up this theory and some scentists say that the only thing that will happen during the next week is lower than usual low tide and a higher than usual high tide, quoting them “A Super Moon is nothing to get excited about”  so according to them all the past natural disasters that happened during Super Moons are nothing but pure coincidences….let’s hope for our sake they’re right..

Some on the other hand think that the question if we should start stocking survival shelters in preparation for the supermoon is not actually that crazy…In fact scientists have studied related scenarios for decades. Even under normal conditions, the moon is close enough to Earth to make its weighty presence felt: It causes the ebb and flow of the ocean tides. The moon’s gravity can even cause small but measureable ebbs and flows in the continents, called “land tides” or “solid Earth tides,” too. The tides are greatest during full and new moons, when the sun and moon are aligned either on the same or opposite sides of the Earth.

According to John Vidale, a seismologist at the University of Washington in Seattle and director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, particularly dramatic land and ocean tides do trigger earthquakes. “Both the moon and sun do stress the Earth a tiny bit, and when we look hard we can see a very small increase in tectonic activity when they’re aligned,” Vidale told Life’s Little Mysteries.

At times of full and new moons, “you see a less-than-1-percent increase in earthquake activity, and a slightly higher response in volcanoes.”

The effect of tides on seismic activity is greatest in subduction zones such as the Pacific Northwest, where one tectonic plate is sliding under another. William Wilcock, another seismologist at the University of Washington, explained: “When you have a low tide, there’s less water, so the pressure on the seafloor is smaller. That pressure is clamping the fault together, so when it’s not there, it makes it easier for the fault to slip.”

According to Wilcock, earthquake activity in subduction zones at low tides is 10 percent higher than at other times of the day, but he hasn’t observed any correlations between earthquake activity and especially low tides at new and full moons. Vidale has observed only a very small correlation.

What about during a lunar perigee? Can we expect more earthquakes and volcanic eruptions on March 19, when the full moon will be so close?

The moon’s gravitational pull at lunar perigee, the scientists say, is not different enough from its pull at other times to significantly change the height of the tides and thus the likelihood of natural disasters. “A lot of studies have been done on this kind of thing by USGS scientists and others,” John Bellini, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey, told Life’s Little Mysteries. “They haven’t found anything significant at all.”

Vidale concurred. “Practically speaking, you’ll never see any effect of lunar perigee,” he said. “It’s somewhere between ‘It has no effect’ and ‘It’s so small you don’t see any effect.'”

The bottom line is, the upcoming supermoon won’t cause a preponderance of earthquakes, although the idea isn’t a crazy one. “Earthquakes don’t respond as much to the tides as you’d think they would. There should actually be more of an effect,” said Vidale.

Most natural disasters have nothing to do with the moon at all. The Earth has a lot of pent up energy, and it releases it anytime the buildup gets too great. The supermoon probably won’t push it past the tipping point, but we’ll know for sure, one way or the other, by March 20.


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